Deadly 'megafires' the new normal in California

Deadly 'megafires' the new normal in CaliforniaBorn of tinder dry conditions and erratic winds, the "Camp Fire" was the latest California megafire, a huge blaze that burns more intensely and quickly than anything the state has experienced before. The U.S. Forest Service defines a megafire as a single blaze that burns more than 100,000 acres (40,000 hectares). In recent years authorities in California have reported an increase in such large, explosive and swiftly spreading wildfires over a virtually year-round fire season.



Man convicted on terrorism charge in 2017 Michigan airport stabbing

Man convicted on terrorism charge in 2017 Michigan airport stabbingA jury in Flint, Michigan, found Amor Ftouhi, 51, of the Canadian province of Quebec, guilty on charges of committing an act of violence at an international airport, interference with airport security and committing an act of terrorism, the court said. Ftouhi had pleaded not guilty and the trial began last week in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan.



Teams 'look for skulls' in ashes of California's deadliest wildfire

Teams 'look for skulls' in ashes of California's deadliest wildfireThe intensified effort to locate victims came on the sixth day of a blaze that incinerated over 7,000 homes and other buildings, including most of the town of Paradise in the Sierra foothills of rural Butte County about 175 miles (280 km) north of San Francisco. County Sheriff Kory Honea said 228 people were listed as missing, and his office also was conducting "well-being checks" on nearly 1,300 individuals whose loved ones had reported concern for their whereabouts. By Tuesday, the killer blaze dubbed the Camp Fire had blackened 125,000 acres (50,500 hectares) of drought-parched scrub and brush, up 8,000 acres from the night before, but crews had carved containment lines around nearly a third of the fire's expanding perimeter.



Sitting in the embers, Californians wonder: can Paradise be rebuilt?

Sitting in the embers, Californians wonder: can Paradise be rebuilt?Like many residents of this town of about 27,000 in the Sierra Nevada foothills of Northern California, Reasons came to Paradise for its spectacular natural vistas and affordability. By Tuesday, the fire about 175 miles (280 km) north of San Francisco expanded to 125,000 acres. "We consider ourselves survivors, and we will come back from the ashes," said Paradise Emergency Operations Coordinator Jim Broshears, a resident since 1974. "We are fully committed to building a new Paradise".   Rebuilding will take a lot of work, but those who love the town say it will be worth it.



El Chapo is a scapegoat for drug lord who bribed Mexico's president: lawyer

El Chapo is a scapegoat for drug lord who bribed Mexico's president: lawyer"He's blamed for being the leader while the real leaders are living freely and openly in Mexico," attorney Jeffrey Lichtman said on the first day of Guzman's trial for drug smuggling in Brooklyn federal court, which is expected to last up to four months. Mayo Zambada did." Lichtman also said that Zambada had been left free because he "bribes the entire government of Mexico including up to the very top, the current president of Mexico," Enrique Pena Nieto. Pena Nieto's spokesman said of the accusation: "That is false." Lichtman's statement came after Assistant U.S. Attorney Adam Fels laid out the U.S. government's case, describing how prosecutors would prove that Guzman rose from a low-level marijuana trafficker in the 1970s to lead the powerful Sinaloa Cartel.





Close Window